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Turkey Stock

Turkey Stock

I recently roasted a turkey and threw the carcass (including the wings) into a large stockpot along with some celery, onion, carrot, garlic, fresh herbs, and water then simmered it covered in the oven at a low heat overnight. You guys! It’s the best turkey stock I HAVE EVER MADE. The stock turned gelatinous once I refrigerated it and I got so excited because I knew I had a really good batch of stock. It turns out, if your turkey stock turns into a jelly-like consistency after it’s been cooled, you’ve made your stock perfectly. The bones (especially the wings) have collagen inside of them, and when you simmer them for a long time, it breaks down into gelatin and makes a very rich and delicious stock.

Sadly, I didn’t take any ingredient photos or process photos because it was so late at night and I was too tired after a full day of cooking. Since the turkey stock turned out so well, I snapped a quick cell phone photo and decided to share it with you. If you roast a turkey this Thanksgiving, try making this stock!!!

How to Make Turkey Stock

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.

Remove most of the skin from the turkey carcass and place it in a large stockpot. Add the chicken wings (don’t bother removing the skin from them). Add the onion wedges, celery, carrots, garlic cloves, fresh parsley, fresh thyme, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Fill the stockpot with water until covering the carcass. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and place in the oven.

Simmer covered in the oven overnight, or for 10 hours. In the morning, strain the mixture through a fine sieve. Discard the bones and veggies. Pour the stock back into the stockpot and simmer on the stove for about 20-30 minutes, uncovered, to reduce a bit and get a richer flavor, make sure to skim off any fat from the top of the stock.

Pour the stock through a fine sieve (again) into storing containers. Allow the stock to cool completely then remove any remaining fat that floated to the top of the stock. Once it has cooled, seal with a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate until needed. Enjoy!

Turkey Stock

Turkey Stock

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 hours
Total Time: 10 hours 15 minutes
Course: Soup
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Thanksgiving
Author: Pam - For the Love of Cooking

Equipment

  • Large Stockpot

Ingredients

  • 1 turkey carcass plus the wings
  • 2 small onions, cut into wedges
  • 3 stalks of celery, roughly chopped
  • 3 carrots, roughly chopped
  • 5 cloves of garlic, skins removed
  • Handful of fresh parsley (stems & all)
  • 2-3 small sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1-2 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.
  • Remove most of the skin from the turkey carcass and place it in a large stockpot. Add the chicken wings (don't bother removing the skin from them).
  • Add the onion wedges, celery, carrots, garlic cloves, fresh parsley, fresh thyme, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Fill the stockpot with water until covering the carcass.
  • Cover with a tight-fitting lid and place in the oven. Simmer covered in the oven overnight.
  • In the morning, strain the mixture through a fine sieve. Discard the bones and veggies.
  • Pour the stock back into the stockpot and simmer on the stove for about 20-30 minutes, uncovered, to reduce a bit and get a richer flavor, make sure to skim off any fat from the top of the stock.
  • Pour the stock through a fine sieve (again) into storing containers. Allow the stock to cool then remove any remaining fat that floated to the top of the stock.
  • Once it has cooled, seal with a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate until needed. Enjoy!
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7 Comments

  1. Homemade stock is the BEST! I usually make beef stock as I drink it every single day.

  2. Home made stock is the best. I made chicken stock last night in my slow cooker with the carcass of a rotisserie chicken. I set it on low for 12 hours. Similar ingredients. I like to defat mine using my gravy separator.

    You can freeze it or pressure can it. Super simple

  3. Looks perfect Pam and something we like to do as well. Sometimes, I roast the bones first then do as you described to get an even richer flavor.

  4. Turkey fat has a tendency to be too strong when cooked for a long time. I solved this problem by adding a portion of leaf lettuce to the pot. The difference was noticeable immediately , the broth was flavorful without the overpowering taste of turkey fat.