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Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread

I saw this recipe recently on the Food Network for Ina Garten’s Irish soda bread that sounded delicious and fun to make. There is no yeast involved in this bread making so it’s much less intimidating and actually quite simple to throw together. The loaf smelled amazing while it baked and tasted even better. We slathered pieces fresh from the oven in butter and it was wonderful! I especially loved the bits of sweet/tart currants in each and every bite and the subtle hint of orange from the zest. I was curious how my kids would feel about this soda bread since it isn’t sweet, and it turned out just as I thought it would – my daughter enjoyed it and my son wasn’t a big fan.

Irish Soda Bread

How to Make Irish Soda Bread

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine the flour, sugar, salt, and baking soda together in a bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or a hand mixer will work too). Add the butter and mix at low speed until the butter is mixed into the flour.

Whisk together the buttermilk, egg, and orange zest in a separate bowl until very well combined.

Slowly add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture and mix until just combined.

Add a tablespoon of flour to the dried currants and mix until evenly coated. Side Note: This step helps ensure the currants won’t sink to the bottom of the loaf while baking. 

Fold the dried currants into the dough until evenly combined. Dump the dough out onto a floured board and knead it a few times into a round loaf. Place the loaf on the prepared baking sheet and lightly cut an x into the top of the bread with a serrated knife.

Irish Soda Bread

Place into the oven and bake for 45-55 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. When you tap the loaf, it should have a hollow sound.

Cool on a baking rack. Serve warm or at room temperature. Enjoy.

Irish Soda Bread

 

Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Course: Breads and Muffins
Cuisine: Irish
Keyword: St. Patrick's Day
Servings: 1 Loaf
Author: Pam - For the Love of Cooking / Original by Ina Garten

Ingredients

  • 4 cups + 1 tbsp flour, divided
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 4 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2 inch dice
  • 1 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1 extra large egg
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • 1 cup dried currants

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 
  • Combine the 4 cups of flour, sugar, salt, and baking soda together in a bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or a hand mixer will work too). 
  • Add the butter and mix at low speed until the butter is mixed into the flour. 
  • Whisk together the buttermilk, egg, and orange zest in a separate bowl until very well combined. 
  • Slowly add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture and mix until just combined. 
  • Add a tablespoon of flour to the dried currants and mix until evenly coated. 
    Side Note: This step helps ensure the currants won't sink to the bottom of the loaf while baking. 
  • Fold the dried currants into the dough until evenly combined. 
  • Dump the dough out onto a floured board and knead it a few times into a round loaf. 
  • Place the loaf on the prepared baking sheet and lightly cut an x into the top of the bread with a serrated knife.
  • Place into the oven and bake for 45-55 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. When you tap the loaf, it should have a hollow sound.
  • Cool on a baking rack. Serve warm or at room temperature. Enjoy.
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9 Comments

  1. mmm…my favourite! So good when it’s fresh and hot out from the oven! I need to bake one too.

  2. That does sound good. I have been making a lot of plum bread just recently (trying to use up last years dried plums before this years are upon us, I see the trees are already in flower!). Happy weekend, Diane

    1. KC,

      I’ve never tried it with chopped-up prunes but I assume it would work just fine. Please let me know how it turns out if you try.

      -Pam

  3. Mark picked up an Irish Soda Bread from our supermarket’s bake shop. They include malted barley powder in their bread, and it gives it a very nice flavor. I’ve never made Irish Soda Bread, but yours looks delicious with its hint of orange.

  4. I’ve never really loved soda bread but this has me wishing for a warm slice right now!

  5. I had a problem with my batter being too loose. If I put it on a cookie sheet as directed It would spread too much. I put the dough in a greased cast iron skillet. The loaf rose high and kept it’s shape. Another option would be to hold back 3/4 cup of buttermilk. Once mixed with batter, you can add a little of the 3/4 cup bit by bit until the dough is kneadable but not dry.